Curious to know what your students are thinking about your teaching and their learning?

Looking for efficient ways to collect and analyze constructive student feedback? 

Interested in discussing productive approaches for engaging in responsive teaching?

What?

Soliciting, analyzing, and responding to student feedback has great potential for optimizing current and future student learning and for advancing specific course elements. Midcourse feedback can inform mid-quarter adjustments yielding a better experience for both teachers and learners.

 

Why?

Research tells us that student evaluations do not necessarily lead to improved teaching. Whereas reflective and responsive teaching can provide insight about the direction in which eSET ratings are headed; inform the adjustment of teaching practices; demonstrate responsiveness to student needs; enhance student reflection and accountability; offer student autonomy as active participants in their education; increase motivation; build student-teacher relationships; and create positive classroom environments. Students also tend to recognize the value of course feedback and thus complete final course evaluations.

 

How?

Here at CTL we offer a wide range of approaches to collect, analyze, and respond to student feedback.

 

When?

Contact CTL early enough in the quarter to be able to respond to students’ provided feedback. 

 

Download our Service Card

Midterm In-Class Survey

A Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) is facilitated by a CTL faculty member who meets with students at the end of a class session. Without the teacher present, the facilitator guides small group discussions arriving at a consensus of:

  1. what is contributing to students’ learning success;
  2. what is impeding their learning; and
  3. what students can do to improve their learning experience.

Custom designed questions about specific course elements (such a new teaching approach) may also be included. During a private follow-up consultation, the collected and summarized information is shared with the teacher. The results are collaboratively interpreted and ideas for responsive and productive course advancement are collaboratively discussed. 

Midterm Online Survey

An online anonymous survey is created and distributed by a CTL faculty member. Survey questions address:

  1. what is contributing to students’ learning success;
  2. what is impeding their learning; and
  3. what students themselves can do to improve their learning experience. 

Custom designed questions about specific course elements (such a new teaching approach) may also be included. After the surveys are complete a CTL staff member will review the comments to ensure appropriateness and summarize the information. During a private follow-up consultation, the results are collaboratively interpreted and ideas for responsive and productive course advancement are collaboratively discussed. As a word of caution, although online surveys preserve class time they tend to produce low response rates. 

Video Recording

View your teaching through your students’ eyes. Seeing and hearing what your teaching looks and sounds like is an invaluable experience. During a private follow-up consultation, collaboratively discuss ideas for responsive and productive course and teaching advancement with a CTL faculty member. 

Supportive Classroom Observations

Peer Observations are the most frequently acknowledged method for improving teaching. Graduates from the Teaching Triad Professional Learning Community are interested in providing this support (as are CTL staff if preferred). Through structured teaching observations and intellectual coaching, peers collaboratively address questions, needs, and opportunities in the advancement of teaching. The work is intended to be supportive, formative, and voluntary (not evaluative). 

Contact CTL at any time to receive a list of faculty (across discipline content areas) who are Teaching Triad graduates.

End-of-course Evaluations

With the assistance of a CTL faculty member collaboratively interpret your eSET results and discuss ideas for responsive and productive course advancement.